REID - SCHROEDER Genealogies
Genealogies of the David REID and Evelyn SCHROEDER families
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Jacob C. FUNK

Jacob C. FUNK[1]

Male 1851 - 1921  (69 years)

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  • Name Jacob C. FUNK 
    Born 18 Nov 1851  Heinrichsdorf, Volhynia, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Baptism 15 Aug 1883  [2
    Health Died of stomach cancer. 
    History Goessel MB p. 10: "im Maerz 1893 nach Oklahoma gezogen. (Attest erhielt)".
    His obituary in the Zionsbote says he was born 18 Nov 1851. One record says he was born in 1852. After his father died when he was 14 years old, he lived with is sister Anna and her husband. In 1877 his possessions were destroyed by fire while living in Lichtfelde. In 1878 he was an overseer for Philipp Wiebe. During this time his right hand was injured in a sawmill. In 1881 he moved to Asia, where he was robbed by thieves. He was baptized by his brother Cornelius Funk in 1883 and joined the Mennonite Brethren. He was a song leader and German teacher in Asia. He lived in Kansas after immigrating to the U.S. in 1885 and moved to Oklahoma in 1893. He traveled back to Russia to marry his third wife. (Viola Funk 3-99) 
    Immigration 5 Sep 1885  Elbe; New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Occupation Farmer 
    Reference Number 078ja 
    Buried Abt Jul 1921  Mennonite Brethren Cemetery, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 14 Jul 1921  Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I16068  Reid Family | Lynn's side of the family
    Last Modified 8 Jul 2013 

    Father Kornelius FUNK,   b. Abt 1810,   d. Abt 1866  (Age ~ 56 years) 
    Mother Helena UNRUH,   b. Abt 1815,   d. Abt 1854  (Age ~ 39 years) 
    Married Abt 1835 
    Family ID F13100  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Maria B. KOOP,   b. 22 Dec 1865, Tiegerweide, Molotschna Colony, South Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 May 1888, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years) 
    Married 12 Sep 1882  Asiatic Russia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
    +1. Jakob K. FUNK,   b. 23 Feb 1884, Tashkent, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, South Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Dec 1961, Rosedale, Kern, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     2. Maria FUNK,   b. Abt Jul 1885, Samara, Asiatic Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Sep 1885  (Age ~ 0 years)
     3. Tomas FUNK,   b. 15 Nov 1886, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 1887  (Age 0 years)
     4. Heinrich FUNK,   b. 3 May 1888, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F5944  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Helena Thomas JANZEN,   b. 19 Feb 1866, Karolswalde, Volhynia, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 May 1897, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 31 years) 
    Married 10 Mar 1889  [4
    Children 
     1. Samuel J. FUNK,   b. 22 Dec 1890, Newton, Harvey, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1984, Madera, Madera, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
     2. David J. FUNK,   b. 27 Aug 1893, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Oct 1946, Havre, Hill, Montana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     3. Ferdinand J. FUNK,   b. 1 Apr 1892, Newton, Harvey, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Oct 1979, Glasgow, Valley, Montana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
     4. Isaak FUNK,   b. 7 Dec 1894, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jun 1899  (Age 4 years)
    +5. Kornelius James FUNK,   b. 23 Feb 1896, Washita Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 May 1976, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     6. Abraham FUNK,   b. 15 Mar 1897, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Mar 1897, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Photos
    Funk, Jacob C. & Helena T
    Funk, Jacob C. & Helena T
    Photo courtesy of: Delsie Doris "Funk" Brooks, Montana.
    Family ID F5979  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Helena LOEWEN,   b. 11 Jan 1859, Prangenau, Molotschna Colony, South Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jul 1932, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 19 Apr 1898  Rueckenau, Molotschna Colony, South Russia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Anna FUNK,   b. 17 Apr 1899, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Apr 1970, Dinuba, Tulare, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     2. Lena FUNK,   b. 4 Oct 1902,   d. 4 Oct 1902  (Age 0 years)
     3. Helena FUNK,   b. 12 Jul 1904, Washita Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F11472  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 18 Nov 1851 - Heinrichsdorf, Volhynia, Poland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Abt Jul 1921 - Mennonite Brethren Cemetery, Corn, Washita, Oklahoma Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 Jul 1921 - Oklahoma Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Funk, Jacob C.
    Funk, Jacob C.

    Headstones
    Funk, Jacob C. (HS)
    Funk, Jacob C. (HS)

    Ships
    S.S. Elbe
    S.S. Elbe
    SS Elbe was built in the Govan Shipyard of John Elder & Company, Ltd, Glasgow, in 1881 for the Norddeutscher Lloyd of Bremen. The Elbe had a 3 cylinder compound engine which provided power to her single-screw propeller. She was a fast ship for her time, being able to reach the speed of 15 knots, but small cargo capacity, along with her high consumption of coal, would soon make her uneconomical. She had a straight bow, two funnels and four masts. She was launched on 2 April 1881. After sea trials she made her maiden voyage on 26 June 1881, leaving Bremen for New York via Southampton. The Elbe had accommodation for 179 first-class passengers, 142 in second class, and 796 in steerage. She was a very popular ship with immigrants from Europe to the United States and was virtually always sold out in steerage. The Elbe spent most of the next ten years working the North Atlantic service, but she also made three voyages to Adelaide in Australia, two of which were in December 1889 and 1890.

    Disaster in the North Sea
    The night of 30 January 1895 was stormy. In the North Sea, conditions were freezing and there were huge seas. SS Elbe had left Bremerhaven for New York earlier in the day with 354 passengers aboard. Also at sea on this rough night was the steamship Crathie, sailing from Aberdeen in Scotland, heading for Rotterdam. As conditions grew worse, the Elbe discharged warning rockets to alert other ships to her presence. The Crathie either did not see the warning rockets or chose to ignore them. She did not alter her course, with such disastrous consequences, that she struck the liner on her port side with such force that whole compartments of the Elbe were immediately flooded. The collision happened at 5:30 am and most of the passengers were still asleep.
    The Elbe began to sink immediately and the captain, von Gossel, gave the order to abandon ship. Amid great scenes of panic the crew managed to lower two of the Elbe's lifeboats. One of the lifeboats capsized as too many passengers tried in vain to squeeze into the boat. Twenty people scrambled into the second lifeboat, of whom 15 were members of the crew. The others were four male second-class passengers and a young lady’s maid by the name of Anna Boecker, who had been lucky enough to be pulled from the raging sea after the first boat had capsized. Meanwhile on the other side of the Elbe, Captain von Gossel had ordered all the women and children to assemble there but no other lifeboats were launched because the ropes on the derricks were all frozen up, and so they perished along with the captain. Within 20 minutes of the collision, the Elbe had sunk and the only survivors were the 20 people in the one surviving lifeboat. These people now had to endure mountainous seas and below-zero temperatures and they were 50 miles from land. Things looked bleak; the Elbe's distress rockets had not been seen by any passing vessels and so no one knew of their predicament. After five hours in the raging storm, their luck changed. A fishing smack from Lowestoft called the Wildflower found them. In desperate conditions the crew of the Wildflower struggled to pull the 20 survivors from the lifeboat, which had begun to break up. The skipper, William Wright, said later that the survivors would not have lasted another hour in those conditions, and believed that the only reason they had stayed alive for five hours was the expertise of the Elbe's crewmen aboard the lifeboat.

    Steamship Crathie
    The Crathie was a steamer of about 475 tons gross and 272 net. She left Rotterdam with general cargo for Aberdeen on January 29th 1895 carrying just 12 hands. The Craithie was also badly damaged in the collision and returned to Rotterdam flying signals of distress. When later asked why they had not stayed on to help the Elbe and her passengers, the captain, Alexander Gordon, said that he feared that his ship would sink, and in any case he did not hear any cries for help coming from the liner. It appeared to him that the Elbe was steaming away from his position.

    Miss Anna Boecker
    Of the twenty who survived the sinking, only one was a female. Anna Boecker was a shy, quiet maid in the employment of an elderly lady, travelling with her employer to Southampton. In the panic and confusion of the collision she had been unable to save her employer. She joined the terrified crush of passengers lowered into the first lifeboat. When it capsized under the sheer weight of numbers, Anna ended up in the ocean. All the others from her lifeboat clambered back onto the sinking ship. Anna was alone in the treacherous sea until the survivors in the second lifeboat spotted her floundering in the water and pulled her up to safety.

    Repercussions
    The SS Elbe incident resulted in a court case which took place in Rotterdam in November 1895. The court found that the steamship Crathie was alone at fault for the collision. Amazingly the captain was merely censured for leaving the disaster, a verdict that astounded the maritime world at the time. The blame was put squarely on the first mate, who had left his post at the bridge at the critical time to chat in the galley with other crew members, and therefore had failed in his job of operating the ship's warning lights. The captain, officers and sailors of the SS Elbe received no rebuke from the court either, which caused some concern amongst the German public. The crew of the fishing smack Wildflower each were given, by Kaiser Wilhelm II, a silver and gold watch bearing his monogram and £5 as a gesture of thanks for saving the lives of the eighteen German citizens, an Austrian, and the English pilot. They also received other medals and gifts in the following years.

    Wreck identified in 1987
    In the early part of 1987 a group of Dutch amateur divers searched and located the wreck of the Elbe on the sea bed. They managed to salvage a small quantity of the glasswork and a quantity of procelain as well as earthenware from the wreck site, which enabled them to identify the wreck.

  • Sources 
    1. [S41] Genealogical Registry and Database of Mennonite Ancestry (GRANDMA 2.0), (Published by the Genealogy Project Committee of the California Mennonite Historical Society; 4824 East Butler Avenue, Fresno, California 93727-5097; Phone (559) 453-2225).

    2. [S56] Mennonite Brethren Gemeindebuch (Corn, Oklahoma), (Center for Mennonite Brethren Studies; Fresno, CA; Hillsboro, KS; Winnipeg, Manitoba), Pg. 40.

    3. [S112] Migration From the Russian Empire, Lists of Passengers Arriving at the Port of New York, (published by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1995), Pg. 379.

    4. [S56] Mennonite Brethren Gemeindebuch (Corn, Oklahoma), (Center for Mennonite Brethren Studies; Fresno, CA; Hillsboro, KS; Winnipeg, Manitoba), Pgs. 40, 191.