REID - SCHROEDER Genealogies
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Ruby Carol COX

Ruby Carol COX

Female 1917 - 1996  (79 years)

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  • Name Ruby Carol COX 
    Born 9 Jun 1917  Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Gender Female 
    Baptism Abt 1928  Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Education BIOLA, Wheaton ('41) 
    Health Died 18 Oct 1996 from pulmonary embolism, leading to atrial fibrillation, eventual respiratory arrest and finally Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA). The E.R. team worked on her approximately 20 minutes but was unable to resuscitate her and pronounced her dead at 10:29 AM. She had been having intermittent bouts of sounding short of breath for the one week prior to her death, but due to her Alzheimer's, never really complained of it. Only on that final morning did she call her husband and tell him she didn't feel well and to come get her. She was taken to the Emergency Room of Hemet Valley Medical Center by her husband in the car at 9:30 AM, arrived with mottled skin, labored breathing but still awake and talking. She was taken straight back, X-rays did not show congestive heart failure, her oxygen saturation was only 85%, monitor showed atrial fibrillation, not a previous condition for her. She also had not had any previous pulmonary problems. At 10:10 AM her condition deteriorated rapidly and she slipped into a full cardio-pulmonary arrest from which she never recovered. 
    History Obituary - Orange County Register - Tuesday, 22 Oct 1996
    Died - Ruby C. Reid, 79, of Hemet, a retired elementary school teacher for Garden Grove Unified School District, died Friday of a pulmonary embolism. Services: 11:30 AM today, Fairhaven Memorial Park, Santa Ana.
    Survivors: husband, Cyril; sons, Don, David; daughter, Judi; sisters, Rhoda Wheeler and Letitia Woods; brother, Glen Cox; four grandchildren.
    SSDI states card issued in Texas before 1951. 
    Occupation Elementary Teacher 
    Religion Presbyterian, Baptist 
    Social Security Number 464-30-4612 
    Died 18 Oct 1996  Hemet Valley Hospital, Hemet, Riverside, California Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Buried 22 Oct 1996  Fairhaven Memorial Park, Santa Ana, Orange, California Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Lot 162, #5, Lawn R
    Notes 
    • I am Ruby, the 11th child of Charles and Roxanne Cox. While I am of sound mind and in a jolly mood, I would like, for the sake of my children, grandchildren, and siblings, to write a little bit about my roots. I have been in and around this world for 3/4 of a century, hunting things about my parents all these years. I have lived with most of my brothers and sisters being the youngest in the family, and have watched them, one by one, get married and move away, until I was the only one left at home. That is going from absolute bedlam to absolute quiet and loneliness.
      It took seventeen years for Roxanne and Charles to have eleven kids, and I was the last of the brood. Our whole family was known as Coxie's army. Mother had run out of names by the time I was born, so asked all the siblings to put a name in the hat and she would draw a name. So she drew Charles' entry - Ruby Carol. Can you believe that Mother wanted to name me Enid, which I don't exactly care for?
      We lived all my young life at 2619 Walnut Street, Bellingham, Washington. It was a well used house with that many kids around. Just remember that in those days, there was no electricity. Everything was done in the old-fashioned way. We all had our chores to do and there was no putting them off. We had a woodshed, where we stored wood for the kitchen stove. We had a wood stove in the living room until oil burning stoves came into existence. The washing (done by the old wringer washer) would extend from home to Seattle - or so it seemed. We'd take turns bringing in any dry clothes and replacing them with wet ones. At night the clothes froze on the line. It usually took two days to dry all of it. Ironing took the rest of the week - no permanent press in those days. The irons were heated on the kitchen stove.
      Upstairs we had three bedrooms. I occupied the last one with my sister Rhoda. The transom came up through the middle room and it was a temptation to just stand over it for hours. But in our room, we had the chimney - nice and warm. We hugged it for a long time before we took the long leap into bed, between icy sheets. Oh, for an electric blanket! We would also use chambers for trickling in the night, and dutifully carried it downstairs each morning.
      Russ and I played together, had our pictures taken together, threw wood into the woodshed (had to keep the alley clear, you know). Most of all we helped Dad with his beautiful garden. The peas were grown on bents (he called them), and when they got to the shucking stage, we would pick a handful and just throw the pods down anywhere after the innards were eaten. Dad about crowned us, so I/we fooled him and just shucked them right on the vines. Then we really did get it! No more peas - he had so many. Old Schmaltz (Rhoda) wouldn't eat peas until she had peeled them. How does one do that? If she had to take a pill, she'd grind it up in a spoonful of water first.
      It seemed to me that the main reason Mother had to have me was to help with the cooking. I had taken a cooking course under Carolyn Conlee in High School, and now I was ready to take over making cookies. That was no fun with some brothers eating the dough, while others ate the done cookies. That was Saturday morning - all morning. By Saturday night all the cookies were gone. Ugh! Boys! Men!
      After High School, I went to BIOLA for just one year, then on to Wheaton College, from which I graduated. A young man by the name of Cy wouldn't leave me alone, so eventually I entered into wedlock with him. That was fifty years ago last year. We're starting on our next fifty this year and hope to reach at least sixty. Cy has been having a horrible time with his eyes, but both of us have to have cataracts removed soon. Maybe that will help our vision.
      We have three youngsters and four grandchildren. Donald is our oldest and is a High School teacher; Judith is the peanut butter in the sandwich and is a super piano teacher and a songbird. She lives in Loveland, CO as of 1992. Then there is Dr. David A. Reid, our ever-present help in time of physical trouble.

      JUST REMINISCING

      1) Neighbors - They always play a great part of a child's life. Can we ever forget the Boyds next door and him getting out to the car 30 minutes before he left every morning and running it to warm it up. On the other side of us was the Hanson's "Well, I must be going now." Pearl and Johnny were two of their kids we played with. Then the Rosses and Tot - his real name was Carlton, but his girth belied that. Behind us was Mrs. Stony, the Jones, the Walkers, the Kluges, the Sutterleins, the Van Cruyningens (Parkey), and the Prettymans. And who's the lady we picked cherries for over on the next street? The Cox kids came in handy!
      2) The Swing - Can we ever forget the huge swing Dad made for us out under the Linden trees? We had more fun doing acrobatics on it.
      3) Parades - Tot Ross would organize quite a parade yearly with all the kids around. It was dress up and fun. All the neighbors and parents watched us go by. Ruby, being the youngest and probably still being diapered, occupied the KEEP DRY box at the parade's end.
      4) Canning - Oh boy! Somebody got up at the crack of dawn and began to pick peas this particular time. Then we all got into a circle in the kitchen, washtub in the middle. Each had a panful of peas. We shucked and we shucked - all morning. Soon the girls dropped out and began the canning process. Two quart jars were used, then Mother put the jars in the clothes boiler to process. What a long day!
      5) Cellar - The big room under the house was called the cellar. There we stored all the canned goods - fruits, vegetables and even root beer.
      6) Automobiles - First we had a Model T which had to be cranked up front to get it to run. It had no windows, just isinglass, which did nothing but let in the outside air and hot air from the front seat. The Model A came next, with windows and a key to turn the thing on like we do today. Only two or three kids could ride at once. So I remember Mother saying, "Who wants to go to Uncle Rodney's?" The noise was deafening. The ones who didn't say anything got to go.
      7) Christmas - You can't imagine the tree. It was hand-picked out in the forest. Dad gave each of us $1.00 and with that we were supposed to get presents for all. Russ got two washcloths for a nickel and gave Mother one for her birthday and one for Christmas. However, it was amazing what you could get for 5¢. We were poor, but when it came to dinner, we all chipped in and ended stuffed with things we had only once a year like that. Dad always washed the dishes and he was convinced that someone was bringing them around a second time to be washed. Doris?
      8) Playtime - We could hardly get supper down before we ran over to Utter Street in front of the Chandler's house and played baseball, Duck on the Rock, Kick the Can, Run Sheep Run, or whatever we could think of. Sometimes it was just talk, singing, or having fun. The Fourth of July was something else.
      9) School - First we went to Columbia School - just a block from us. Sometimes we would hear the school bell ring and then run like Jehu and get into the room before roll was taken. Then we went to Roeder Jr. High. Then on to dear old Whatcom High School. Remember Mr. Emery, Glen? There were a lot of good teachers, except Algebra and Geometry. I didn't learn a thing, cuz I just don't like them.
      10) Church - Broadway United Presbyterian Church was a great place to find a husband or wife. We had such terrific and dynamic people in that church. Can we ever forget the Keyes, Rogers, Morrisons, etc.? We had many fun times there. We would spend all day Sunday and Prayer Meeting night there. Church was our main source of doing things. We had picnics, camping, youth outings, etc., and a good choir. Ruthelsie Lyle led the choir for quite some time.
      11) Flooring - We had no carpets. Linoleum was the thing and it was cold. Rhoda and Letty had to clean the upstairs every Saturday. To clean, newspapers were soaked in water and handfuls were scattered all around the floor, then swept up. That sounds like a neat way to do it.
      12) Aging - I've noticed that this generation (ours) is living at least 5-20 years longer than Mother and Dad's. It must be the food or something. I've already told my kids that they can expect to live into their 90's or 100's.

      You have been very patient to read through all this. I do hope that it has been informative as well as interesting. It has taken a long time, but as of now, I'll let this be it. I want you to understand that any mistakes are the fault of the typewriter, and not the typist. It's been years.!

      Signed: Ruby Carol (Cox) Reid
      Year: End of 1992


      22 October 1996
      Mother's Eulogy

      O death, where is thy sting! I have stood beside hundreds of people that I have just pronounced dead after working futilely on them for five, ten, twenty and even sixty minutes to resuscitate them. I have always been able to split off my emotions from my professional obligations and perform my duties as if I were the mailman out on his daily route. When a close relative dies, there is no splitting off. You must confront it full on. I had a taste of this last April when I helped Dad move Mom into her new residence at Yorkshire House. It was to be one of the most difficult tasks emotionally that I had ever undertaken. Intellectually, I could rationalize it as an absolute necessity, not only for Mom, but for Dad as well. Emotionally, I was taking it as her death, just in slow motion. Nancy Reagan perhaps said it best and most succinctly at the Republican National Convention when she spoke about her husband Ronald and his Alzheimer’s Disease, "Caring for someone with this disease is like saying 'Good-bye' to them slowly." The stark realization hit me that day when I put her in her new home, "My mother's gone, this is just her body, a shell of what she used to be." I could not stop the flow of tears. So why the same emotions now if I have already been down this road. Probably only because of the absolute finality of this moment. The tears are not just tears of personal sorrow and loss, but of the joy of knowing she is with our Lord and Savior, with a heavenly body and fully restored mind.
      There is no greater legacy a woman can leave behind in this world than her own children. Mom devoted herself to her three kids, tirelessly and selflessly. We were her pride and joy; she wept when we wept and she rejoiced when we rejoiced. Being the youngest, I was present on many occasions when people would come up to her and praise her on the way she had raised Don and Judy, on their musical talents that Mom had started with each of them (and tried to with me). I can remember how she would tighten her grip on my little hand as they would play Kamino Ostrow in church together, or play in recitals, as if she were playing the notes herself. She would graciously accept compliments on behalf of her children, but was careful to remind them that they had each surpassed her long ago with their talents. With Don and Judy fighting over the piano at home, that left me free to go out and play ball with the guys down the block, and in general, goof off when it came to things musical. My musical talent thus became one of admiration and appreciation for those that possessed it, and probably played no small role in the selection of my wife, Lynn.
      One of my memories which has had an eternal impact on my life is that my mother was also my Sunday School teacher when I was a small tike of about nine years of age, and it was my own mother who talked to me about Jesus dying for me and for my sins, and through her I came to accept Christ into my life and enroll into a pre-baptismal class, after which I was baptized by my own father one Sunday night in 1958 in the La Jolla First Baptist Church. As a follow-up to that moment, my own son, Michael, was baptized just two days ago by his college group minister, and it was during that ceremony that the memories came flooding back to my mind of Mom and her spiritual dedication to her family, and of the ongoing effect her life has had in my life and the lives of those in my family.
      Mom accomplished in our lives what I hope and pray every mother strives to do; she recognized potential and she nurtured it and fostered in us the desire to fully achieve what we were capable of achieving, yet not to the point of controlling our lives and not leaving us with any choices. There is no way in a brief five to ten minute eulogy to recap a person's entire life. Only the imprint of that person's life on your own life is what will live on. I can still remember my third grade year of school; two very important things happened that year as I look back in time. First, I broke my right arm, and it was from that accident that I decided I wanted to be a doctor. Second, because of the fracture of my dominant arm, I fell behind in school, so much so that my teacher was recommending to Mom that I not be placed in the top class of the fourth grade, not unless I could somehow catch up over the summer. My Mom apparently promised I would, and thus I became introduced to Home Schooling over that summer, much to my consternation. What it taught me was that my Mom knew I had the potential, believed in me, and spent the extra time with me that summer reading and doing math. To tell you the truth, I actually learned more in those two short months than I did the entire third grade year, since it was a one-on-one situation. From fourth grade on my self-esteem and self-confidence was established; I never looked back. I had that sense of knowing who I was and where I was heading. And I owe my profession to a Mother's belief in her own child that he could achieve more than he was achieving with a little extra investment of time and help. I know she was proud of the fact that I became a physician because almost everyone I knew that also knew my Mom stated that she would always refer to me as David, her son, the Doctor.
      I know this is why I personally feel such a sense of loss, because she took great pride in each of our lives and she invested so much of her life in us. It is that form of love and nurturing that gets passed on to the next generation. It is truly the Cycle of Life. It is why she has four outstanding grandchildren today, each of them having achieved greatly in each of their respective fields. And from all the external evidence that exists, the great grandchildren will be no different.
      Sure, Mom had her idiosyncrasies and quirks like all people; some we liked, some we didn't. It's amazing how none of that seems to matter now, death is God's way of wiping the slate clean. None of us particularly enjoyed the last three years as we watched the downward spiral of Alzheimer’s accelerate, even to the point of not always knowing who we, her own children, were when we talked with her on the phone. It was sometimes hard to slip the clutch of your own brain, just so you could communicate on a childlike level with your own mother. The agony of those memories can now be replaced with the glorious realization that she is walking in the full glory and splendor of the Presence of God, never to be fettered by the deficiencies of an earthly body again. It is enough to make those of us still remaining a little envious. I rejoice with my family in knowing that in her victory over the grave, death has no sting.
      Finally, as a last memory of Mom, I can recall the countless times she would play on the piano a famous hymn, "What a Friend We Have in Jesus". She was so good at playing this one hymn, she would add all of her own embellishments and as kids we would all laugh at her as she would gustily sing the words. Today I read these same words and realize that this song was the model for her life, a Life-Song if you will. I would like to close with the words from this well-known hymn. 1) "What a Friend we have in Jesus, All our sins and griefs to bear! What a privilege to carry, Everything to God in prayer! O, what peace we often forfeit, O, what needless pain we bear, All because we do not carry, Everything to God in prayer! 2) Have we trials and temptations? Is there trouble anywhere? We should never be discouraged, Take it to the Lord in prayer. Can we find a friend so faithful Who will all our sorrows share? Jesus knows our every weakness, Take it to the Lord in prayer. 3) Are we weak and heavy-laden, cumbered with a load of care? Precious Savior, still our Refuge - Take it to the Lord in prayer. Do thy friends despise, forsake thee? Take it to the Lord in prayer; In His arms He'll take and shield thee, Thou wilt find a solace there." Her grave marker has been inscribed with a motto taken from the final phrase of this hymn, "In His Loving Care". We felt this best exemplified how she would want us to remember her, for this is how she lived her life.
      So, dear Mother, I know you are in His arms right now, and you have found that eternal solace. I bid you an earthly farewell now, but look forward to the promise of seeing you again in God's glorious heaven. You will be missed by those of us here today who love you. Until we meet again on that glorious day in heaven,

      Your son and friend in Jesus,
      David

      22 October 1996
      Eulogy for RUBY C. REID

      I first met my future mother-in-law, Ruby C. Reid, when I was twenty-one and Dave was nineteen. She was quite striking, with perfectly coifed hair - which I later discovered was a wig. Dave introduced me to her on a Sunday evening at Trinity United Presbyterian Church in Santa Ana, and although I was thrilled to finally meet her, she didn't reciprocate in kind. I didn't understand her reaction then, but now that I'm a mother with a nineteen-year-old son of my own, I empathize with the "Mother Hen Nature" we seem to acquire . (However, Mike knows I think the world of his girlfriend, Kim).
      In spite of the fact that our relationship got off to a rocky start - and she apologized for her initial reaction many times - I grew to love her and admire the many positive traits she had. For instance, she was the one I wanted at the helm of every garage sale because she could sell "ice cubes to Eskimos". And shopping with her was pure fun. She loved it, albeit more when she could get me to spend my money than she spend hers. She was exceptionally creative, especially with being able to find a five-course meal in our bare cupboard while we were in medical school housing.
      I never had to guess what she was thinking or where I stood with her at anytime. Yes, my sensitive feelings could be wounded quite easily by her quick comments, but I usually appreciated her honesty and straightforward responses later. I learned more and more to sift the wheat from the chaff and try to understand what she meant rather than what she said.
      She had a wonderful, dry sense of humor and a great sense of fun, that at times, even transcended the terrible Alzheimer's she had suffered with the last few years. I can see her in Heaven now, looking down and laughing at us as she often would in seemingly sorrowful situations.
      It truly took motherhood for me to realize how wise this woman was. When I was struggling to breastfeed Kathleen, our firstborn daughter, she was the only one who kept encouraging me not to give up, and I knew she spoke from experience. That proved to be one of her wisest words of advice now that I'm aware of the health benefits of breast milk over formula.
      And just think how much wiser she is now that she is in Heaven with Jesus. In a way, I envy her; she's whole and bowing before our Lord on BRAND NEW KNEES.
      by Lynn Reid [5]
    Person ID I6  Reid Family | David's side of the family
    Last Modified 5 Jul 2014 

    Father Charles Henry COX,   b. 23 Mar 1879, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Sep 1949, Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Mother Roxanna (Roxey) BIGNELL,   b. 4 Dec 1879, Porcupine, Pepin, Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Oct 1942, Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 30 Aug 1899  Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • Rev. J. W. Miller
    Photos
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Richard William-1900
    Middle Row: Leonard Rudolph-1905, Charles Henry-1879, Letitia Maude-1910 (sitting on table), Roxey Ann-1879
    Front Row: Glen Edgar-1913 (on Charles’ lap), Clifford Clayton-1908, Walter Lee-1906, Rhoda Janette-1912 (on Roxey’s lap)
    Picture taken in early 1914.
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    This Family of Thirteen Deserves Crown from Tulip Town
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Leonard Rudolph-1905, Walter Lee-1906, Clifford Clayton-1908
    Front Row: Rhoda Janette-1912, Charles Henry-1879, Glen Edgar-1913, Richard William-1900, Letitia Maude-1910, Roxey Ann-1879
    Small Children seated in very front: Ruby Carol-1917, Russell Gordon-1915
    Since the Bellingham Herald a few weeks ago made a survey of Bellingham’s “big families”, showing that Charles Cox, popular driver at the Hotel Leopold, is the father of the largest Bellingham family, the suggestion has been made that Mr. Cox and his family be presented to the readers of The Herald. It is with considerable satisfaction that The Herald is able to comply with the implied request, and herewith presents Mr. and Mrs. Cox and their eleven children, all of whom were born in Bellingham. It also offers the suggestion that they deserve to be crowned as the champion family of Tulip Town.
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Richard William-1900
    Middle Row: Leonard Rudolph-1905, Charles Henry-1879, Letitia Maude-1910 (sitting on table), Roxey Ann-1879
    Front Row: Glen Edgar-1913 (on Charles’ lap), Clifford Clayton-1908, Walter Lee-1906, Rhoda Janette-1912 (on Roxey’s lap)
    Picture taken in early 1914.
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    This Family of Thirteen Deserves Crown from Tulip Town
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Leonard Rudolph-1905, Walter Lee-1906, Clifford Clayton-1908
    Front Row: Rhoda Janette-1912, Charles Henry-1879, Glen Edgar-1913, Richard William-1900, Letitia Maude-1910, Roxey Ann-1879
    Small Children seated in very front: Ruby Carol-1917, Russell Gordon-1915
    Since the Bellingham Herald a few weeks ago made a survey of Bellingham’s “big families”, showing that Charles Cox, popular driver at the Hotel Leopold, is the father of the largest Bellingham family, the suggestion has been made that Mr. Cox and his family be presented to the readers of The Herald. It is with considerable satisfaction that The Herald is able to comply with the implied request, and herewith presents Mr. and Mrs. Cox and their eleven children, all of whom were born in Bellingham. It also offers the suggestion that they deserve to be crowned as the champion family of Tulip Town.
    Documents
    Cox, Charles H. & Bignell, Roxana Marriage Record
    Cox, Charles H. & Bignell, Roxana Marriage Record
    Family ID F55  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Rev. Cyril (Cy) Irving REID,   b. 12 Dec 1915, Reid Farmhouse, Oasis, Monterey, California Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Sep 2000, Evergreen Vista Convalescent Center, Kirkland, King, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 22 Jun 1941  Cox Backyard, Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • 2619 Walnut St., Bellingham, Washington
    Children 
    +1. Living
    +2. Living
     3. Judith (Judi) Carolyn REID,   b. 11 Apr 1945, Dallas, Dallas, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Feb 2007, Windsor Gardens Convalescent Hospital, Anaheim, Orange, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
    Photos
    Reid, C&R Wed
    Reid, C&R Wed
    22 Jun 1941.
    Cox Sisters, Rhoda & Ruby with husbands (1982)
    Cox Sisters, Rhoda & Ruby with husbands (1982)
    Taken in 1982 at the Lyle’s home in Washington.
    Reid, Cyril I.-1915 & Ruby (Jun 1991)
    Reid, Cyril I.-1915 & Ruby (Jun 1991)
    Taken at their 50th wedding anniversary.
    Reid, Cy-1915 & Ruby Family-Jun 1991
    Reid, Cy-1915 & Ruby Family-Jun 1991
    Back Row: Donald Eugene-1943, Judy (Kyser) Reid-1941, Amy Janine-1972, Kathleen Renee-1975, Evelyn Ruth (Schroeder) Reid-1946, David Allan-1948.
    Front Row: Steven Marshall-1971, Judi Carolyn-1945, Cyril Irving-1915, Ruby (Cox) Reid-1917, Michael David-1977.
    Taken at the residence of Fred and Dee Schroeder on the 50th wedding anniversary of Cy and Ruby Reid in June 1991.
    Reid, Cyril I.-1915 & Family (Jun 1994)
    Reid, Cyril I.-1915 & Family (Jun 1994)
    Sitting: David A. Reid-1948, Ruby C. (Cox) Reid-1917, Judi C. Reid-1945
    Standing: Cyril I. Reid-1915, Donald E. Reid-1943
    Taken in Jun 1994 at Ruby Reid’s 77th birthday celebration at Cyril and Ruby’s home in Hemet, California.
    Headstones
    Reid, Cyril & Ruby (Fairhaven)
    Reid, Cyril & Ruby (Fairhaven)
    Fairhaven Memorial Park, Santa Ana, California
    Lot 162, #5, Lawn R
    Family ID F4  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 9 Jun 1917 - Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBaptism - Abt 1928 - Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 22 Jun 1941 - Cox Backyard, Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 Oct 1996 - Hemet Valley Hospital, Hemet, Riverside, California Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 22 Oct 1996 - Fairhaven Memorial Park, Santa Ana, Orange, California Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Cox, Ruby C.jpg
    Cox, Ruby C.jpg
    Taken at her 50th Anniversary to Cyril Reid in June 1991.
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (~1920)
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (~1920)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Richard William-1900
    Middle Row: Leonard Rudolph-1905, Charles Henry-1879, Letitia Maude-1910 (sitting on table), Roxey Ann-1879
    Front Row: Glen Edgar-1913 (on Charles’ lap), Clifford Clayton-1908, Walter Lee-1906, Rhoda Janette-1912 (on Roxey’s lap)
    Picture taken in early 1914.
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    This Family of Thirteen Deserves Crown from Tulip Town
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Leonard Rudolph-1905, Walter Lee-1906, Clifford Clayton-1908
    Front Row: Rhoda Janette-1912, Charles Henry-1879, Glen Edgar-1913, Richard William-1900, Letitia Maude-1910, Roxey Ann-1879
    Small Children seated in very front: Ruby Carol-1917, Russell Gordon-1915
    Since the Bellingham Herald a few weeks ago made a survey of Bellingham’s “big families”, showing that Charles Cox, popular driver at the Hotel Leopold, is the father of the largest Bellingham family, the suggestion has been made that Mr. Cox and his family be presented to the readers of The Herald. It is with considerable satisfaction that The Herald is able to comply with the implied request, and herewith presents Mr. and Mrs. Cox and their eleven children, all of whom were born in Bellingham. It also offers the suggestion that they deserve to be crowned as the champion family of Tulip Town.
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (~1962)
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (~1962)
    Taken around 1962 in Concord, California.
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (1982)
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (1982)
    Taken in 1982 at the Lyle’s home in Washington.
    Wetther, Norm & Joyce & Ruby Reid (~1991)
    Wetther, Norm & Joyce & Ruby Reid (~1991)
    Cox Sisters, Letty, Rhoda & Ruby (Jun 1994)-1
    Cox Sisters, Letty, Rhoda & Ruby (Jun 1994)-1
    Cox Sisters, Letty, Rhoda & Ruby. Taken in June of 1994.
    Cox Sisters, Ruby, Rhoda & Letty (sitting) (Jun 1994)-2
    Cox Sisters, Ruby, Rhoda & Letty (sitting) (Jun 1994)-2
    Cox Sisters, Ruby, Rhoda, & Letty (sitting). Taken in June of 1994.
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (Aug 1940)
    Cox, Ruby Carol-1917 (Aug 1940)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1914)
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Richard William-1900
    Middle Row: Leonard Rudolph-1905, Charles Henry-1879, Letitia Maude-1910 (sitting on table), Roxey Ann-1879
    Front Row: Glen Edgar-1913 (on Charles’ lap), Clifford Clayton-1908, Walter Lee-1906, Rhoda Janette-1912 (on Roxey’s lap)
    Picture taken in early 1914.
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    Cox, Charles H.-1879 & Family (~1920)
    This Family of Thirteen Deserves Crown from Tulip Town
    Back Row: Florence DeEtte-1902, Charles Albert-1903, Leonard Rudolph-1905, Walter Lee-1906, Clifford Clayton-1908
    Front Row: Rhoda Janette-1912, Charles Henry-1879, Glen Edgar-1913, Richard William-1900, Letitia Maude-1910, Roxey Ann-1879
    Small Children seated in very front: Ruby Carol-1917, Russell Gordon-1915
    Since the Bellingham Herald a few weeks ago made a survey of Bellingham’s “big families”, showing that Charles Cox, popular driver at the Hotel Leopold, is the father of the largest Bellingham family, the suggestion has been made that Mr. Cox and his family be presented to the readers of The Herald. It is with considerable satisfaction that The Herald is able to comply with the implied request, and herewith presents Mr. and Mrs. Cox and their eleven children, all of whom were born in Bellingham. It also offers the suggestion that they deserve to be crowned as the champion family of Tulip Town.

  • Sources 
    1. [S198] California Death Index (CDI), Riverside County, California.

    2. [S202] Social Security Death Index (SSDI).

    3. [S239] United States Federal Census, Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington; Enumeration District #209, Pg. 5B.

    4. [S240] United States Federal Census, Bellingham, Whatcom, Washington; Enumeration District #37-6, Pg. 11A.

    5. [S9] Recollections of Ruby Carol COX (REID).

    6. [S421] Washington, Marriage Records, Image #787.